Erica wins Waterhouse Natural Science Art Prize 2018

GALLERY: Erica Seccombe wins Waterhouse Natural Science Art Prize

JUNE 7, 2018 by  JOHN DEXTER  The Adelaide Review

Metamorphosis, a video work depicting a maggot pupating into a fly from Canberra artist Erica Seccombe, has taken out the open category of the Waterhouse Natural Science Art Prize, while fellow Canberran Hayley Lander won the emerging artist category with her painting, The great forgetting.

Judges were impressed by Seccombe’s work for its depiction of an “ordinarily unseen intersection between science and art”, while they found Lander’s painting to be an “affecting and poignant study in natural history”.

The pieces by the two winners were selected from works by 84 exhibiting finalists, which will be on display at the South Australian Museum from Friday, June 8 until Sunday, August 5. Visitors to the museum will also be able to vote for their favourite work in the People’s Choice Dr Wendy Wickes Memoriam Prize of $5000, while a Scientists’ Choice Award of $5000 will also be awarded as part of the now biennial exhibition and prize.

View a selection of the 2018 Waterhouse Natural Science Art Prize entries in the gallery above.

Waterhouse Natural Science Art Prize
South Australian Museum
Friday, June 8 until Sunday, August 5
waterhouse.samuseum.sa.gov.au

https://www.adelaidereview.com.au/arts/visual-arts/gallery-erica-seccombe-wins-waterhouse-natural-science-art-prize/

 Erica Seccombe,  Metamorphosis , 2016, (detail) active stereoscopic projection installation, processed for single channel viewing.  Pupa development at 15 degrees Celsius. 9 datasets from 10% to 100% growth 3D Micro CT.  Imaging and Analysis Centre (IAC), NHM, London, Visualised and animated in Drishti by Erica Seccombe

Erica Seccombe, Metamorphosis, 2016, (detail) active stereoscopic projection installation, processed for single channel viewing. 
Pupa development at 15 degrees Celsius. 9 datasets from 10% to 100% growth 3D Micro CT. 
Imaging and Analysis Centre (IAC), NHM, London,
Visualised and animated in Drishti by Erica Seccombe

A View from the Arboretum

Check out the latest issue of Art + Australia for Erica's essay 'A view from the Arboretum'

  • Seccombe, E., 'A view from the Arboretum', Art + Australia, Issue Three (54.2): Unnaturalism, Editor Edward Colless, Melbourne University, 2018, p 78-81.

Extract:

Lately I have been looking through a high-end virtual reality (VR) headset, exploring a mutable and volatile planet. This is not any fully rendered, illusionary game world; instead, I’ve been immersed in an innovative scientific tool called EcoVR, being developed by Dr Tim Brown and his colleagues at the Australian National University (ANU).2 Tim Brown is director of the ANU node of the Australian Plant Phenomics Facility and a research fellow with the Centre of Excellence in Plant Energy Biology. Phenomics is the study of physical, existential characteristics of an organism, distinct from that organism’s inherited and heritable genetic identity, or genome. Bringing VR into this field of research, Tim Brown is also something of a technology wrangler and futurist. 

Read more at http://www.artandaustralia.com/

Residency at Baldessin Press + Studio 2018

Research Residency at Baldessin Press + Studio

In 2017 Erica applied for and was awarded a small project fund of $3300 by artsACT to learn the photopolymer photogravure technique at Baldessin Press & Studio. This gave her the opportunity to stay at the Studio in St Andrews, Victoria for 7 days in January 2018. This experience included 3 days one-on-one tuition with artist Silvi Glattauer.  For more information https://www.ericaseccombe.com/research-projects/#/research-residency-baldessin-press-studio/

 Erica at Baldessin Press with work in progress, 2018. Photo Silvi Glattauer

Erica at Baldessin Press with work in progress, 2018. Photo Silvi Glattauer

BACKYARDS opens at MAY SPACE SYDNEY

Backyards @ Mayspace Sydney, until 7 October 2017

Curated by Waratah Lahy & Anne-Marie Jean

Anne-Marie Jean, Waratah Lahy, Leo Robba, Erica Seccombe, Lia Tajcnar, Jennifer Taylor, Ruth Waller. 

The idea of a big backyard has long been considered an essential element of Australian iconic culture, synonymous with the fading aspirational ideal of a quarter acre block and a modest home. Our backyards are important spaces: mostly private, they can be practical, useful and fanciful, providing a space for imagination, creativity, toys, pets, projects and failed ambitions. ...

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Exhibition Review: Art Guide, Jane O'Sullivan

Erica Seccombe takes up the issue of reproducibility. in her large anaglyphic print of a toy octopus, Ocularanagluphos, from 2012. This little toy, writ large, asks us to consider how we visualise and engage with our natural world. It looks sharply sci-fi until you put on the flimsy 3D glasses. The blue and red cello lenses smudge the detail, and give little in the way of extra dimension. But what they do instead is peel the blurry sea monster off the wall, hovering it in space and untethering it from any reality....

The Lady Botanist, Imprint Magazine

Patsy Payne reflects on the work of Erica Seccombe, whose exhibition of screenprints and etchings, The Lady Botanist, was recently shown at Megalo Print Studio & Gallery in Canberra.

Erica Seccombe is a storyteller. She unveils mysteries and shows us intriguing forms revealed beneath the skin of things, dragged from the recesses of our memory, perhaps imagined on a dark night. Monsters, hybrids and beasts emerge from the scientific laboratories and virtual spaces in which Seccombe works. She has embarked on a particular project at the Natural History Museum in London. Here she has created new stories to make sense about the history of collecting, microscopy and the scientific pursuit of truth....

 Erica Seccombe, A path divided, 2017, Screen print on paper

Erica Seccombe, A path divided, 2017, Screen print on paper