Ocularanagluphos

Erica Seccombe, Ocularanagluphos, 2011 - 2017

Erica Seccombe Ocularanagluphos, 2012, Anaglyphic print on KMO polyester, 2750 mm x 2530 mm + anaglyphic paper glasses for viewing Imaged in Drishti. Australian National University Department of Applied Mathematics, CT Lab, VizLab, National Computational Infrastructure (NCI)  

Erica Seccombe Ocularanagluphos, 2012, Anaglyphic print on KMO polyester, 2750 mm x 2530 mm + anaglyphic paper glasses for viewing

Imaged in Drishti. Australian National University Department of Applied Mathematics, CT Lab, VizLab, National Computational Infrastructure (NCI)

 

Pop on your red/blue glasses for the full 3D effect! Microcomputed X-ray tomograph, ANU Department of Applied Maths, rendered with Drishti, at VizLab ANU and printed at the ANU Inkjet print facility 2011.

Currently on exhibition at

  • AURA: Repetition, Reproduction, and the Mark of the Artist,
    curated by Ben Rak, travelling exhibition
    Manly Art Gallery & Museum14 July – 3 September 2017
    Wagga Wagga Art Gallery 9 December 2017 – 4 March 2018
    ANU School of Art & Design Gallery 13 April – 20 May 2018

Exhibited in

  • Imitation of Life 2011, curated by Deborah Clark, Canberra Museum and Gallery (now gifted to CMAG) Anaglyph print on paper, 160cm x 196cm.
  • Selected and exhibited for the 37th Alice Prize Exhibition, Alice Springs, NT, 2012, Anaglyph print on paper, 160cm x 196cm.
  • Recreated on canvas and printed in the UK for the exhibition, Time & Vision, curated by Paul Bayley, Barge House, London, 2012

 

    Ocularangagluphos is the result of Seccombe’s exploration of (3D) micro-X-ray Computed Tomography (Micro-CT) of a miniature toy plastic octopus, and is part of a series of work entitled Nanoplastica. The artist has imaged the resulting volumetric data to reveal the external and internal structure in a unique scientific program called Drishti. Now that lenses allow us to see microscopic organisms previously invisible to the naked eye, the infinitesimal can appear to us like monsters. This work is reminiscent of 1950’s cold war sci-fi but also considers the recent boom in 3D entertainment technology and our continuing fascination with scale from the micro to macro. While seemingly playful, this work seriously examines issues of visualization, replication and simulation of the natural world.

    Fellow exhibiting artists Tony Curran and Michael Kempson enjoying the optical illusion of Ocularanagluphos in Aura: Repetition, Reproduction, and the Mark of the Artist

    Fellow exhibiting artists Tony Curran and Michael Kempson enjoying the optical illusion of Ocularanagluphos in Aura: Repetition, Reproduction, and the Mark of the Artist

    Audience at Time & Vision at the Barge House in London, 2012, viewing Ocularanagluphos, 

    Audience at Time & Vision at the Barge House in London, 2012, viewing Ocularanagluphos,